The Latest

Walden, Oregon farmers fight pesticide buffer

thelatestEnvironmentalists take the EPA to court over the enforcement of pesticide buffers as congressmen from the West protest the buffers altogether.

Innovation Program picks up momentum

thelatestThe new Innovation Program in Portland State’s Maseeh College of Engineering is already cooking up some interesting projects, including a novel water filtration system, a mechanism for measuring traffic on foot-bridges, and a noise cancellation mechanism for cars.

Lodgepole pine study raises worries for forests

thelatestA recent study predicting hard times ahead for lodgepole pines adds yet another worry about the future of Oregon forests.

Search is on for clean tech leaders

thelatestA program created by a Portland investment firm seeks to spearhead the development of hot new clean tech companies by identifying proven leaders and bringing them together.

PDC passes the torch to Quinton

thelatestPortland's urban renewal agency celebrated a changing of the guard at its meeting on Wednesday, officially appointing Patrick Quinton as its new executive director while bidding thanks and farewell to the retiring leader he replaces, Bruce Warner.

Politics intrude on Oregon-Israel event

thelatestA new Oregon-Israel chamber of commerce that hosted businessmen and politicians last night to discuss potential business ventures was met at the door by pro-Palestine advocates denouncing a so-called "apartheid state."

Obama praises Intel for investing in Oregon

thelatestPresident Obama gave full credit to Intel Friday for investing and manufacturing in the United States as part of an ongoing campaign to improve relations with the business community.

Kitzhaber visits the shipyard to promote ideas for boosting jobs

thelatestGov. John Kitzhaber announced new initiatives designed to boost manufacturing jobs before meeting with executives from several major employers Wednesday.

Facebook backs open source in Corvallis

thelatestOregon State University's Open Source Lab was formed as a nonprofit in 2005, and it receives support from the likes of IBM and Google. The latest tech giant to contribute is Facebook.

Opponents to sue over Monsanto alfalfa crop

thelatestA national food safety group is gearing up to sue the federal government over the controversial practice of planting genetically modified alfalfa seeds. Farmers are following the issue with great interest in Oregon, where alfalfa is a $175 million crop.

Bills target initiatives, campaign finance

thelatestThe house rules committee will hold a hearing next Monday on two bills that seek to improve Oregon's initiative process and provide more transparency to political contributions.

University reform gains momentum

thelatestThe latest stop on the campaign trail for higher education reform happened last night at Portland State University, where education officials repeated many of their same proposals: less state regulation and line item budgets, more university control of tuition. More efficient and independent universities able to save on costs while expanding the reach and quality of education.

24 million pounds of e-waste gets recycled

thelatestDuring the first year of a statewide ban on dumping electronics in the trash, Oregonians recycled more than 24 million pounds of electronics, or about 5 million pounds more than they did in 2009.

Long journey for Oregon Trail game

thelatestThe pioneering computer game Oregon Trail enters its 40th year with a hot iPhone app and a key Facebook launch. A closer look into the game's history offers insight for all those raised in an age of educational computer games. There's also something of a parable for game developers here in the Silicon Forest about a man with a clever idea and brilliant approach, actualized with the help of state support and outside business investment, who eventually took control of his vision and built the most successful educational video game ever.

Facebook hits Oregon Trail

thelatestSay you're under 40 and, like most everyone else, you log into your Facebook account today. You'll notice the latest iteration of a game you played in elementary school, Oregon Trail. Only instead of rationing your resources in a classroom, you can now play for hours with friends online, spend real money in the form of facebook credits on wagon gadgetry, and, say, bomb down the Green River collecting gold coins and rescuing drowning children.

Lompoc expands in North Portland

thelatestBeer enthusiasts, construction workers and a few North Williams Avenue residents stood in the cold this morning to watch an enormous crane hoist a 30-foot-tall grain silo atop Lompoc's Fifth Quarter brewery in North Portland. Among them was giddy Lompoc owner Jerry Fechter, who said the $65,000 silo will reduce his brewing costs by 25%.

State sues Countrywide for $14 million

thelatestOregon has filed two lawsuits against the infamous subprime mortgage lender Countrywide in an attempt to recover $14 million in losses to the state's pension and worker's comp funds.

Funding, pay and graduation rates lag for Oregon universities

thelatestThe latest numbers show that Oregon's support of higher education has crumbled, faculty pay lags behind other states and graduation rates have crept below the national average.

Bob's Red Mill donates $5 million to OSU

thelatestThe founders of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods are giving $5 million to Oregon State University to establish an academic center that will boost the school's research in areas such as nutrition and childhood obesity.

OSU strengthens connections with the private sector

thelatestOregon State University changed the name of its Office of Technology Transfer on Monday, a seemingly minor step but one university officials call a major shift in philosophy that could also prove lucrative. The new Office for Commercialization and Corporate Development will take a more proactive approach in finding and selling research projects.

EPA backs away from biomass regulations

thelatestThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced it will defer for three years any greenhouse gas permitting requirements for biomass, potentially boosting the industry that Oregon advocates say can create thousands of jobs, provide a renewable fuel source for the state, and propel thinning projects in national forests.