Rough & Ready closes; Nike disses South Waterfront

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The Latest
Friday, April 19, 2013

 

BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Rough & Ready, a 90 year-old mill in Cave Junction closed yesterday. The mill was featured in an article that appears in our current issue — Timber Split — reported by Dan Cook.

In Cook's story, Phillippi was equivocal about the mill's future. Rough & Ready’s primary tree supply comes in the 22-to 24-inch diameter range — far short of the 60 inches that often characterize old-growth trees, she said. The trees that are generally included in federal thinning proposals are less than 20 inches, and those trees are unsuitable for many lumber markets. Phillippi said the mill could reopen if efforts to create a timber trust on O & C lands prove successful.

In other OB updates: Dissing Portland's South Waterfront neighborhood, Nike decided to expand its headquarters in Washington County instead, yet another example of the trend we reported on yesterday about jobs fleeing the urban core.

And finally: a few days after women's soccer team The Portland Thorns played their first game, the Oregonian's Anna Griffin reports on the advertising brou-ha-ha caused by a Timbers' marketing campaign featuring t-shirts with the slogan "Feeling Thorny?"  Suffice it to say the campaign was killed almost as quickly as it was created.

OB reporter Jon Bell featured the Thorns in his April cover story profiling Game Changers in Oregon's sports market.

OB Editor Linda Baker keeps tabs on public policy and CEO issues, with frequent forays into entrepreneurship, innovation, and bikes.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 Fleeing the urban core?Guest 2013-04-19 21:28:49
Nike's expansion in Washington County is not "yet another example of the trend we reported yesterday about jobs fleeing the urban core". Nike wasn't fleeing, they were (sensibly) expanding at their current location. Not being attracted is different than fleeing. Let's try to keep things in perspective, shall we?
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Guest
0 #2 EditorGuest 2013-04-19 21:48:38
Point taken. However, Nike’s choice does call attention to urban suburban job growth challenges. And of course I should have mentioned Integra’s departure for Vancouver, which is indeed, an example of the trend we reported on yesterday.
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