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Big banks backing off fees

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The Latest
Friday, October 28, 2011

A month after Bank of America dealt with the wrath of customers for announcing new debit card fees, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. decided not to charge similar fees.

The New York bank's Chase retail unit is one of the largest U.S. consumer banks, with 26.5 million checking accounts and 5,300 branches.
J.P. Morgan joins U.S. Bancorp, Citigroup Inc., PNC Financial Services Group Inc., KeyCorp and other large banks that have said in recent days that they won't impose monthly fees on debit cards. None of those banks said they made their decisions because of the outcry over Bank of America's fees.
"We looked at all options and quickly decided it didn't fit with our overall strategy," said David Bowen, who runs the consumer-product business at Cleveland-based Key, which ranks among the 20 largest banks in the country.
Banks are loading fees onto customer accounts in an attempt to recover billions of dollars in revenue that will be lost from new restrictions on debit cards, credit cards and overdrafts. Most big banks have already eliminated free checking for customers who don't meet certain criteria on their accounts, such as minimum balances or a certain number of direct deposit transactions.

Read more from The Wall Street Journal.

 

 

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Happy
0 #1 TheivesHappy 2011-10-28 11:51:34
Yeah Those crooks make enough $ off of us already
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