Home The Latest Oregon launches Wellness@Work

Oregon launches Wellness@Work

| Print |  Email
The Latest
Thursday, July 14, 2011

By Emma Hall

wellnesswork_bugTwo years of collaboration between the Oregon Health Authority and business leaders has resulted in a new initiative called Wellness@Work. The initiative's website launched this week with tools for companies to check their current wellness level and simple ideas on how to improve the health of employees.

Workplace wellness is important for workers to stay healthy, but also helps cut costs for businesses, especially welcome in the current economic climate. Healthy workers means less  absenteeism and lower costs for health care, disability and workers' compensation. While Oregon faces high unemployment and a budget shortfall, the state is spending 16% of the general fund budget on health care.

In contrast to previous programs that focused on individual wellness, Wellness@Work targets businesses. “We’re hoping businesses will bring together a committee of employees from all departments to make changes to their workplaces,” says Dawn Robbins, the Work Site Wellness coordinator for the state.

Robbins says that they understand these are tough economic times, so some workplaces may be wary of spending money up front to build a culture of health. However, “lots of research shows that when employees adopt comprehensive wellness, the return on investment is high,” she says.

Currently, health care costs are soaring in Oregon, with smoking alone causing 7,000 deaths and an estimated $2.4 billion in costs and lost productivity each year, according to the Oregon Department of Human Services. Wellness@Work provides resources for businesses to help their employees quit smoking, as well as for creating a tobacco-free work environment. The initiative stems from the idea that Oregonians spend nearly half their waking hours at work, and creating a culture of wellness in the workplace could dramatically improve the state’s health.

Obesity costs the state more than $781 million in medical costs; that grows to  more than $1 billion when including lost productivity and related health conditions. Nearly two-thirds of adults in Oregon are overweight or obese. Wellness@Work aims to lower this number by providing tips on how employers can get their workers moving more and eating better at work. One example is that if employees walk for 30 minutes each work day, they will meet the CDC’s physical activity recommendations—which only 57% of Oregonians are currently meeting.

Wellness initiatives are very important in the businesses that rank in Oregon Business magazine’s 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon each year. Company yoga sessions tipped Ruby Receptionists into the #2 best medium company spot in 2011. Healthier employees are good for them, and good for the bottom line.

Emma Hall is web editor for Oregon Business.

 

 

Comments   

 
@StLambo
0 #1 Oregon launches wellness@work@StLambo 2011-07-15 10:37:44
Great points and it's amazing how much it costs each year for smoking and obesity related diseases in Oregon. It's sad that most people rely on someone else to manage their own health. Great programs like this will definitely make an impact in people's lives and health, in addition to increased productivity. It will be interesting to see how much this program saves in health care dollars after three years. Building a culture of health and vitality will be the driving force of the modern organization.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Chris
0 #2 Great newsChris 2011-07-18 10:49:35
It's inspiring to see corporate and government organizations getting serious about workplace wellness. Small actions every day can really make an impact for individual employees but also the overall health of the workplace. A number of additional benefits were written about here in this article on Well-being Wire: http://wellbeingwire.meyouhealth.com/work-environment/the-big-impact-of-well-being-in-the-workplace/
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #3 Wonderful to see!-JulieGuest 2014-04-01 21:56:21
I love the fact that business are starting to see the importance of wellness in the workplace. Especially with longer and longer hours at the desk. Sitting for too many hours a day is very hard on the body! Now it's just time to add massage;) www.portlandmassagestudio.com
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Buyer's Remorse

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Parents and students paying for college today are like homeowners who bought a house just before the housing bubble burst.


Read more...

Molecular Movies

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Dr. Chong Fang isn’t God. But the assistant professor of chemistry at Oregon State University is getting closer to figuring out how he put everything together. 


Read more...

Video: The 100 Best Survey

News
Thursday, August 28, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1OB Research Editor Kim Moore shares some pointers about the 100 Best Companies to Work For survey.


Read more...

Private liberal arts education: superior outcomes, competitive price

Contributed Blogs
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
0826 thumb collegemoneyBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

Why has six years become an acceptable investment in public undergraduate education that over-promises and underperforms?


Read more...

Gender Code

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY COURTNEY SHERWOOD

Janice Levenhagen-Seeley reprograms tech.


Read more...

Risks & rewards of owning triple net investments

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, July 24, 2014
NNNinvestmentBY CLIFF HOCKLEY | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

With the increasing retirements of Baby Boomers, a massive real estate shift has created a significant increase in demand for NNN properties. The result? Increased demand has triggered higher prices and lower yields.


Read more...

Back to School

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

By now we’ve all read the headlines: Starbucks is giving away free degrees. Except it isn’t.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS