Call center brings jobs to Coos Bay

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The Latest
Tuesday, March 29, 2011
By Corey Paul
Remember when Gov. John Kitzhaber told the state's business leaders that rural and metro Oregon must grow at the same pace? "Creating 15 jobs in Coos Bay," he said, "is the same as creating 500 jobs in Portland."

Well Coos Bay just landed 250 jobs, when First Call Resolution announced this week that it will open a call center downtown. It's welcome news in a county with a 12% unemployment rate. And, by the governor's metric, those 250 jobs are the equivalent of more than 8,300 jobs in Portland.

"That's going to have a wonderful impact on the vitality downtown," says Joyce Jansen, economic revitalization administrator for Coos Bay. The center will be at Anderson Avenue and Second Court Street, two blocks from the boardwalk.

Renovations have just begun, and it likely will begin operating by early fall with about 50 employees, says John Stadter, president and managing partner of the company. In a year or so, it will fill to 250, he says, as his two other centers did in Grant's Pass and Roseburg.

"I think we offer a pretty good reputation of doing what we say we are going to do as a company," he says, adding something of a pledge that First Call Resolution won't renege.

The company chose Coos Bay for several reasons, Stradter says: It's close to the Roseburg headquarters, he has high regard for a state business developer in the area and "the employee base there is just really strong." First Call Resolution's expansion marks the second time Stradter has opened a call center in Coos Bay. The first one came about 12 years ago when he was working as an operations manager for 800 Support. Now that center has a different owner, but it still employs hundreds.

Employees at the new center will field support calls for various industries, including health care, travel and wireless. Entry level jobs will start at $9 an hour with benefits, and a profit-sharing plan will be available to employees who stay two years. "Our intent is to be a complete, real employer, instead of just churning employees like a lot of call centers do," Stadter says.

When Jansen talked to Oregon Business, word hadn't yet spread around the town, but she anticipated excitement. "Anytime we get a new business, we kind of celebrate."


Corey Paul is an associate writer at Oregon Business.




 

Comments   

 
Crystal Jones
0 #1 applying for job openingsCrystal Jones 2011-04-12 10:12:25
I have worked for ACS for 3 years and would like to try a different call center. I have computer experience and also going to school for a certificate in Medical Clerical. I would like the opportunity to work for your company. Have heard good things about this company.
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Tommy
+1 #2 I also work for ACSTommy 2011-06-23 12:58:06
But I need another job.
-The pressure and and unreal expectations for $9 an hour, Is unreal.
-Dangeling Bonuses that you'll never get,
Really hurts moral.
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Anonymous
+1 #3 ACS won't last...Anonymous 2011-07-13 11:00:25
Without getting too specific, for the sake of my own position, ACS Coos Bay is failing miserably. There is no solid structure; we've gone through four General Managers in three years, no coherent plan ever stays in effect, and every time it seems the company is succeeding they fire employees by the dozens and then complain that there's not enough people to do the work. This is followed with mandatory overtime, followed immediately by decreased morale.

Management is constantly restructuring the bonus requirements to ensure that very few employees actually leave with a bonus. That's not a conspiracy theory; I've been to the meetings. Management is concerned with maximizing their personal bonuses, but they are not paid well for the same thing that their employees are paid well for. This leads them to create policies that screw over employees, while firing the top-earning employees for not following the self-defeating policies, just so they can secure the biggest bonus possible.

Either way, if First Call Resolution is honest about the work they intend to do, they have hundreds of well-trained employees they can pull from ACS who would gladly leave for any company that will value them as employees. Honesty and strait-forwardn ess will go a long way with pre-ACS employees who are used to being mislead and lied to for management to bonus. Best part is, ACS spent a lot of money training some very skilled employees, and then drove them off; I hope they bring success to FCR.
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Jeannine Brock
0 #4 Jeannine Brock 2012-01-24 09:34:50
I too worked for ACS for 5 years and after 5 years and changes to the center that I believe were not good for it, I decided to quit. I would defintely be interested in securing a position with the new call center. I have many years of customer service and I enjoy helping peopl
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Jessica Glazier
0 #5 Cant wait for you to open and be in businessJessica Glazier 2012-01-25 20:55:12
I have worked for ACS a few times and like the call center environment and would be interested in working for a new company in town.
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Guest
0 #6 FCRGuest 2013-07-17 01:18:27
First call resolution is a great opportunity for someone looking for an entry level position in customer service.

They genuinely care about those with families (as well as those who do not) and do everything possible to keep you in a position regardless of clients layoffs.

If you are offered a position, grab it up as soon as you can. Feel comfortable to bring up concerns with your supervisor, or if necessary the site manager. They will be addressed quickly.

There are certain clients that are better suited for extremely tenured agents or robotic agents, but FCR is growing quickly and continuously in discussions with potential clients. The variety of clients available makes it great for someone who finds that one clients expectations are just too over the top. If you find yourself in the type of situation where you feel the client you are on is not a good fit, and you think one of the other clients would be better, be sure to address it with the site manager or your supervisor as soon as possible. Switching is not an option once you are getting low quality.
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