Walden, Oregon farmers fight pesticide buffer

| Print |  Email
The Latest
Tuesday, March 08, 2011

BY PETER BELAND

A legal battle that has waged for more than eight years over the enforcement of pesticide buffers between farmland and bodies of water that would protect endangered salmonids heats up as conservation groups confront antagonism from legislators.

Rep. Greg Walden (R-Oregon) recently delivered a speech on the House floor, claiming that the buffer zones could take a hypothetical 108-acre farm and shave it down to 10-acres. “This crop field, which now produces $21,000 in income — if the federal government’s rules as full described here — you’d be down to $1,500,” he said. Walden went on to say the buffer zones could take 40 percent to 67 percent of Oregon’s farmland out of production, based on statistics from the early 1990s. He and 17 other Congressmen co-signed a letter written by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Washington) in late January to Council of Environmental Quality chairwoman Nancy Sutley. They are protesting the enforcement of the buffers that have been drawn up based on continuing studies done by the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Though the parameters of the buffer zones are there, the Environmental Protection Agency has so far only asked for voluntary labeling of three pesticides identified by National Marine Fisheries Services scientists as harmful to salmonids if sprayed within 100 to 1,000 feet of streams. For the remaining pesticides that have not been studied in depth, the EPA is enforcing a 60 to 300 foot buffer.

A number of conservation groups represented by Oakland-based environmental law firm EarthJustice filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency last November for its failure to enforce the pesticide restrictions as required by a Biological Opinion report done by the National Marine Fisheries Service. It is the latest in a string of lawsuits that began in 2002 when a federal judge in Washington required the EPA to consult with the NMFS to assess the impact of 37 pesticides on salmonids as required by the Endangered Species Act. “The EPA has an obligation to comply with the ESA,” says EarthJustice attorney Amanda Goodwin.

The lawsuit stresses that the EPA must abide by the findings of the first of 17 planned biological opinions, completed in 2008. The first biological opinion recommends 100 to 1,000 foot buffers for three pesticides. Two more biological opinions have been done since that time and the findings of three more will be released next month. The remaining 13 biological opinions will be completed by February 2012. “This process has worked for decades,” says Goodwin of the ESA consultation process by which all federal agencies refer to the NMFS to address concerns of harm to endangered wildlife.

Representatives from Oregon’s farming community disagree, claiming the process is rooted in faulty science and lack of stakeholder input. “We believe they didn’t use the best available data,” says Oregonians for Food and Shelter executive director Terry Witt. “They relied very heavily on models.” According to Witt, the models predicted pesticide amounts in the waterways thousands of times greater than recorded levels.

The EPA told Oregon Business today via e-mail that, concerning accusations from conservationists that it was not fulfilling its obligations to enforce the buffers, it "will respond to the plaintiffs' allegations through the appropriate legal channels."  In response to anti-buffer advocates' lack of faith regarding NMFS' methods to determine how harmful a given pesticide is, the EPA said that "...several public meetings have been held by NMFS to obtain input on how additional information such as crop locations, agricultural practices and water quality monitoring data may best be used in the course of ESA consultations."

Peter Beland is a contributing writer for Oregon Business.

 

Comments   

 
Jo Dhooghe
0 #1 Wrong DebateJo Dhooghe 2011-03-14 12:05:31
This is the wrong debate. Instead of arguing over how much of buffer zone there should be between toxic chemical applications and waterways, we aught to be looking at alternatives to the toxic chemicals. This is why Republicans have such a bad reputation with people who consider themselves environmentalis ts. No body is trying to deprive farmers of a decent living. But how about educating them on more viable alternatives than poisoning the environment we all share. Organic farming is old school. We need to be going back to that, not just for the sake of the environment, but for the sake of the farmers themselves. Just in our family we've had 3 uncles, a father and both grandfathers (all farmers)die of cancer before the age of 60. Something is seriously wrong here, folks. Let's change this debate.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

The short list: 5 companies making a mint off kale

The Latest
Thursday, November 20, 2014
kale-thumbnailBY OB STAFF

Farmers, grocery stores and food processors cash in on kale.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...

See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


Read more...

Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


Read more...

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...

Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS