Home The Latest Change brightens lighting opportunities

Change brightens lighting opportunities

| Print |  Email
The Latest
Monday, October 04, 2010

By Michael Gurton

In September, General Electric, with its ties to American inventor and lightbulb luminary Thomas Edison, closed its last major incandescent light factory, laying off more than 200 workers.  The shuttering wasn’t the result of the economic downturn, but was due to congressionally-mandated changes in efficiency standards that have increased the adoption of new forms of lighting, such as the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). 

The blame for the shuttering of this factory lies with GE, as many of the new forms of lighting that have gained market share in the wake of Congress’s mandate were initially developed, but not commercialized, at GE.  These new forms of lighting will transform Oregon’s homes, street and businesses and could serve as a boon to local manufacturers.

In 2007, Congress passed a bill banning Edison’s incandescent bulb by 2014, setting the stage for the growth of longer-lasting and more energy-efficient, spiral-shaped CFL.  CFLs -- developed by a research lab at GE in the 1970s, but never produced by the company --  are more expensive than incandescent lights because the glass lamps are blown and shaped by hand, mostly by Chinese laborers.  The sales growth of these lights has been swift. According to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, a trade association for lighting manufacturers, one in five bulbs bought in the US are CFLs.

Another GE lighting innovation, the light emitting diode (LED), produces a very high-intensity light with low energy use.  These lights, used for many years in digital watches, have a small diode instead of a filament that is illuminated by electrons passing through a semiconductor chip.  Unlike the CFL, LEDs can’t produce enough light for a whole room or work space but their long lifespan are ideal for industrial uses such as outdoor signs, traffic lights, bike lights and streetlights. 

According to Helen Vydra Roy, editor-in-chief of online publication New Streetlights, LED lighting holds great promise for US-based manufacturers.  “The major lighting companies like GE and Philips were not focused on roadway LEDs.”  This strategy, she states, “has allowed smaller, US-based players to move to the forefront.”  Vydra Roy makes the caveat that while these companies are US-based, the chips in the LEDs are manufactured in Asia.

Portland General Electric is currently spearheading several pilots with local municipalities to test the impact of LED streetlights.  Even though PGE’s self-funded pilot is not beholden to federal stimulus funding provisions that the lights must be assembled in the US, it could serve to jumpstart adoption of US-assembled LEDs. And at least one Oregon company is leaping at the opportunity.

Tucked in a non-descript Tualatin industrial park sits The Light Edge, a 10-year-old lighting manufacturer that got its start developing high-output fluorescent lights which are now installed in factories and warehouses throughout the world. 

Over the last two years, the company has created several LED products, including a streetlight that is currently used in many municipal pilots, such as PGE’s, throughout the Pacific Northwest.  David Gerton, company founder and president, sees the company’s LEDs, which are price-competitive with both American competitors such as Cree and Acuity and Netherlands-based powerhouse Philips, as a future growth opportunity that could put his company ahead of the curve.

While past missteps may have contributed to America losing its manufacturing might, there are companies, even in our own backyard, who are still on the cutting-edge of innovation and are seizing on the opportunities that come along with change.

Michael Gurton is the Director of MarketLink, a service of the Oregon Microenterprise Network that provides microenterprises and second-stage companies throughout Oregon with no-cost market research. The Light Edge is a non-paying client of his.

 

Comments   

 
Ricklight
0 #1 Tell the truthRicklight 2010-10-04 15:42:35
You start with false statements! The current noise that Congress had anything to do with GE closing a plant is pure politics. The job loss is bad news, but blaming Congress is ignorant ranting.

CFLs have been heavily promoted by power companies and money/energy saving people far earlier than the 2007 law. I saw my first CFL in a retail store in 1989. Trade and labor policies are far more to blame. However even had we all bought GE CFLs (at least the ones made here) the incandescent plant would still be closing. Times change, and energy is expensive.

The extreme drive to low cost products drove CFL manufacturing overseas. And it gave us one of the worst pieces of equipment ever. High quality CFLs work better and really last. There is a very real threat the same can happen with LEDs, and for the same reasons.

Making people angry at the government won't help.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
David
0 #2 David 2010-10-27 16:23:27
One of the things that business owners of commercial properties should be taking advantage of are the tax incentives and rebates associated with solar panels. You should fill out this survey to see if going green with solar panels makes sense for your business,
https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dE9vbWdEZ1ZXSFl3ZXpKaXVUUUE3Q1E6MQ
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Wheel man

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Les Schwab has put a premium on customer service since 1952, when legendary namesake Les Schwab founded the company with one store in Prineville. (Schwab died in 2007.) But if the corporate principles remain essentially the same, the world around this iconic Oregon business has changed dramatically.


Read more...

Why I became an educator

News
Tuesday, March 04, 2014
03.04.14 thumbnail teachBY DEBRA RINGOLD | GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

How can we strengthen the performance of institutions charged with teaching what Francis Fukuyama calls the social virtues (reciprocity, moral obligation, duty toward community, and trust) necessary for successful markets and democracy itself?


Read more...

How to handle the unexpected

Contributed Blogs
Friday, March 28, 2014
03.28.14 thumb disasterBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

The next mysterious (or disastrous) event could be one that you or your team might suddenly need to respond to, probably under intense scrutiny.


Read more...

Branching out

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
DSC04185BY LINDA BAKER

A blueberry bush is a blueberry bush — except when it’s a blueberry tree.


Read more...

Video: Kickstarting Oregon business

News
Thursday, March 27, 2014
02.04.14 Thumbnail VideoBY JESSICA RIDGWAY | OB WEB EDITOR

Watch this OB Original Video about three Oregon companies and how crowd-funding "kickstarted" their business ideas.


Read more...

Speeding up science

News
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
02.25.14 Thumbnail MedwasteBY JOE ROJAS-BURKE | OB BLOGGER

The medical research enterprise wastes tens of billions of dollars a year on irrelevant studies. It’s time to fix it.


Read more...

Workplace benefits

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Health care and vacations rule. That’s the consensus from our reader poll on workplace benefits that help retain and recruit employees.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS