July news updates

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The Latest
Thursday, August 01, 2013

BY EMMA HALL | OREGON BUSINESS WEB EDITOR

From departed politicians to controversial wolves, it's time to update some recent Oregon Business stories.

 0712 Conversation RudyCrew Like everyone else, we've been following the news (gossip, really) about the recently-departed Rudy Crew. Crew lasted barely a year in his position as Oregon Chief Education Office before defecting to become a college president in New York. The high-profile Crew made $1,300 a day here, though he rarely worked on Fridays and violated state expense and travel rules numerous times. He also held 25 jobs in 40 years. Tsk tsk. None of this came up in our July 2012 profile of the then newly hired Crew.
Rudy Crew, pictured in our July/August 2012 issue.
In happier news, three new wolf pups were caught on camera in Oregon's newly formed Mount Emily pack. Well, that is happy news for the wolf tourism groups we profiled in our July/August issue, but not so happy for the ranchers that are fighting to keep wolves away from their cattle. wolfpups
Wolf pups caught on camera by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
0713 Tactics 01 In our latest issue we also spoke to Consumer Cellular CEO John Marick, head of the Tigard company that eschews chasing the latest and greatest in favor of catering to the growing demographic of aging baby boomers. Marick is a finalist in the individual achievement category of the Oregon Entrepreneurs Network awards. The other two contenders are Puppet Labs CEO Luke Kanies and Cloudability CEO Mat Ellis. Winners will be announced on Sept. 17.
Consumer Cellular CEO John Marick, photo by Adam Bacher

Education and politics, ranching and entrepreneurs--we like to cover a range of topics at Oregon Business. If your story needs to be told, let us know at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 chief gruntGuest 2013-08-01 19:02:00
we have heard numerous stories about the wolf population which was reintroduced, is not the same species of wolf as was native to the northwest; that this present species is bigger, likes to kill just for the fun. In Eastern Oregon, we have had experiences of the new wolf stalking 3 yr old humans, till wolf was shot; of not killing one baby animal-whether calf or lamb or elk or deer, but several--and not eating any. Is this a more aggressive, bigger wolf than was native???
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