Home The Latest Oregonian shifts to digital model, announces layoffs

Oregonian shifts to digital model, announces layoffs

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The Latest
Thursday, June 20, 2013

 BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

06.20.13 Blog NewspaperThe Oregonian will reduce print delivery to four days a week as the paper shifts to a digitally focused news enterprise.

The Oregonian also announced the creation of a digitally focused media company, Oregonian Media Group, which will launch this fall to expand news and information products in Oregon and Southwest Washington. 

Beginning October 1, the new company will operate OregonLive.com and publish The Oregonian and its related print products. A separate company, Advance Central Services Oregon, will provide support services for Oregonian Media Group and other companies.

The company's restructuring is a seismic event for the state's largest newspaper and for the state's publishing industry.

Publisher Chris Anderson declined to comment on ad revenues or other financial information impacting the company's digital shift. 

"Today is an exciting day for the future of journalism in Oregon," he told Oregon Business. "Our audience has been growing by double digits every month for the past several years.  We will seek to serve the information needs of Oregonians with new products and services that extend our journalism to an even larger audience."

Anderson also declined to comment on layoffs.

"I told our staff today that every employee of The Oregonian is a person, not a number, so I’m not answering questions about staffing levels," he said. "We will continue to have Oregon’s largest news-gathering and content-creation team as well as Oregon’s largest media sales organization – by far."

Twitter feeds from Oregonian staffers reveal a grim worried mood in the newsroom, along with tidbits of information such as the drug testing the new company will require of all employees.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 ConcernedGuest 2013-06-26 15:31:21
Has this business model actually worked for anyone? Three or four other newspapers have gone to it, but is it keeping the doors open or merely prolonging their eventual demise. Reading two to three stories online is fine. Trying to read a "whole" paper online is too tedious.
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