2013 100 Best Green Companies to Work For in Oregon announced

| Print |  Email
The Latest
Wednesday, May 29, 2013

BY OB STAFF

05.30.13 Blog GreenPressPORTLAND – About 300 people turned out today for Oregon Business magazine’s fifth annual celebration of the 100 Best Green Companies to Work for in Oregon.

Based on its widely recognized 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon project, the 100 Best Green Companies were determined by an anonymous employee survey and an independent assessment of the employers’ sustainability practices. There were 440 organizations and more than 20,000 employees participating in the project. Companies must enter either the 100 Best Companies survey or the 100 Best Nonprofits survey to be eligible for the 100 Best Green ranking.

The 100 Best Green Companies are featured in the June issue of Oregon Business magazine, which was unveiled this afternoon at a luncheon at The Nines Hotel.

The top 10 100 Best Green Companies are:

  1. Research Into Action, Portland
  2. Standing  Stone Brewing Co., Ashland
  3. Gerding Edlen, Portland
  4. Rose City Mortgage, Portland
  5. DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel — Portland
  6. Sokol Blosser Winery, Dundee
  7. Oregon Environmental Council
  8. Capital Pacific Bank
  9. Mountain Rose Herbs, Eugene
  10. Rogue Creamery, Central Point

See the full list of the 100 Best Green Companies to Work For in Oregon.

For more information on the 100 Best projects, go to Oregon100Best.com.

Oregon Business is a locally owned statewide business publication founded in 1981.

 

 

More Articles

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...

The clean fuels opportunity

News
Monday, November 10, 2014
111014-dirtyfuel-thumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A market for low-carbon transportation fuels has a chance to flourish in Oregon if regulators adopt the second phase of the state’s Clean Fuels Program.


Read more...

Legislative Preview: A Shifting Balance

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY APRIL STREETER

Democratic gains pave the way for a revival of environment and labor bills as revenue reform languishes.


Read more...

Leading with the right brain

News
Tuesday, December 09, 2014
120914-manderson-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

On the eve of the Portland Ad Federation's Rosey Awards, Matt Anderson, CEO of Struck, talks about the transition from creative director to CEO, the Portland talent pool and whether data is the new black in the creative services sector.


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS