Portland Metro Area

Portland Metro Area
Minority contracts go to white men
High Five
Wednesday, January 06, 2010

Businesses owned by white men are receiving 51% of the money from a Portland minority contract program.

Read more...
 
Portland loses Velveteria
High Five
Monday, January 04, 2010

After four years in business as a local icon, the velvet painting museum is closing.

Read more...
 
Adams focuses on software industry
High Five
Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Portland Mayor Sam Adams discusses strategies to nurture the software community in 2010.

Read more...
 
Walmart's new store faces opposition
High Five
Wednesday, December 23, 2009

The retail giant announces plans to build a second Portland store at Hayden Meadows.

Read more...
 
Jobs Watch: A rough year, but it's all relative
Ben Jacklet
Wednesday, December 23, 2009

One of the advantages of working for a monthly publication is the week-long holiday we all take to recharge for the new year, a little time to step back and let others feed the media beast. It's a nice perk any year, but after 2009 a few days of rest and reflection are more vital than ever. I can't say I enjoyed 2009, but I did survive it. You know things are iffy when you feel fortunate just to have a job that isn't getting chopped and a home that isn't getting sold out from under you through foreclosure. I believe it was Einstein who said that it's all relative.

For better or worse, I'm entering my 22nd year of journalism in 2010. I've covered deadly dull town board meetings in Guilderland, NY, surreal street demonstrations in Seattle and commercial fishing on Lake Malawi. As careers go it's been borderline when measured by pay. Another way to look at it is that I've gotten front-row access to great events and amazing people, and I've gotten paid to hunt things down and write about my findings. There are worse ways to go through life than following your instincts from story to story.

If you had told me 25 years ago I would end up working as managing editor for a business publication, I would have suggested you put down the crack pipe and guess again. But here I am. I had not covered business fulltime before taking this job almost exactly two years ago, and in my fervor to embrace my new beat I started reading The Wall Street Journal every day and talking to as many executives and analysts as possible. That's when I started getting this strong sense of impending doom. One of my first major stories for the magazine was The Party's Over, a dark look at group denial, the housing market and the Oregon economy.

Read more...
 


Page 246 of 339