5 Things I Learned About Google Glass

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Monday, September 16, 2013
BY BJORN VAN DER VOO | OB WEBMASTER

Google-Glass-preso-thumbBe it fad or future fashion, Google Glass is attracting strong interest in the web development field. Around 80 people turned out at the headquarters of Portland web services company WebTrends last Thursday, reeled in by a presentation on "Developing/Designing for Google Glass."

For developers, it's apparent that future businesses and startups could be built around apps for Glass, the wearable computer with a head-mounted display. For web designers and webmasters such as myself, keeping up with evolving screen dimensions is becoming a necessity of the job.

For everyone else, it remains to be seen how much of a fact of life the devices will be.

Eric Redmond, author of an upcoming book on Google Glass, showed off the device, which is still in a limited, pre-public release program. Here are some of the things I learned about a device that is part work tool, part fun toy, and part privacy cannibalizer.



 

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