Washington County considers building changes

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Washington County is considering relaxing building height restrictions to help Nike expand.

The gesture is not in the same ballpark as Portland's possible $80-million incentives package to draw the company to the South Waterfront District. But it comes as speculation intensifies about where in Oregon Nike will expand.

Julia Brim-Edwards, Nike's senior director of government and public affairs, gave the company's support for the ordinance at a Washington County Board of Commissioners' meeting Tuesday, but offered little in the way of certainty.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}washington county{/biztweet}

 

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