Navy won't send ships to Rose Festival

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

The U.S. Navy won't send ships to the Portland Rose Festival or Seattle's SeaFair because of mandatory budget cuts.

The mandatory cuts, known as sequestration, were intended to be a budget outcome so dire that it would force Congress and the White House to reach an agreement on a new budget. But the sides couldn't agree on spending priorities nor how to reduce the deficit, so sequestration went into effect March 1.

"We were actually anticipating that it was going to happen," said Rich Jarvis, the Rose Festival's public relations manager. "We're disappointed. It's a bit of a wow factor we won't have."

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}rose festival{/biztweet}

 

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