Home Must Reads Last partner drops out of Coos Bay coal port project

Last partner drops out of Coos Bay coal port project

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Must Reads
Tuesday, April 02, 2013

The last partner dropped out of a proposal to ship coal from Montana and Wyoming to Asia through the Port of Coos Bay.

Metropolitan Stevedore Company of Wilmington, Calif., known as Metro Ports, did not renew the exclusive negotiating agreement that expired Sunday, the port said. Two other partners dropped out earlier.

Port CEO David Koch said the port was continuing to develop new shipping facilities, but did not say if that would include coal.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}coos bay coal{/biztweet}

 

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