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Washington County considers food-composting

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Must Reads
Friday, March 22, 2013

Washington County is considering piloting its own commercial food-waste collection in Tigard, Tualatin and Durham.

County staff and commissioners are aware of the less-than-popular Portland precedent, they said at a work session this week, but also concerned about the effects of continuing to send waste to a near-capacity landfill in Yamhill County.

Much of the caution among commissioners centers on a structural regional issue: Though the county controls whether and which food waste is collected, it's the regional waste management agency, Metro, that controls where that waste goes. It's a system that continues to raise the ire of North Plains residents on the back-end of Portland's food waste program.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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