Prison whistleblower fired

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Friday, March 15, 2013

Oregon Corrections Enterprises administrator Rob Killgore was fired. He blew the whistle on questionable hiring and spending at the Oregon Department of Corrections.

Killgore's concerns touched off an investigation last October by the state Justice Department. Investigators found no criminal conduct but did find a pattern of corrections officials turning to Corrections Enterprises for favors ranging from furniture to donations to their charities.

"I have no doubt this is retaliation for turning in the original information," Killgore told The Oregonian on Thursday. He noted that his allegations also concerned conduct by Peters.

Peters, through an aide, denied any retaliation. "This change has nothing to do with the recent criminal investigation," said Liz Craig, DOC communications manager.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}prison whistleblower{/biztweet}

 

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