OSU researchers find new use for grape pulp

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Friday, March 15, 2013

Oregon State University researchers have discovered ways to convert pulp from crushed wine grapes into usable products.

The school’s extension service said the pomace, which consists of stems, skins and seeds, can provide substances for natural food preservatives, biodegradable packaging materials and a nutritional enhancement for baked goods.

The discovery could help defray the 4 million pounds of waste that the U.S. wine industry creates during processing each year. The bulk of the country’s wine production takes place in Oregon and California.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}osu grape{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Old school: Paulsen's Pharmacy maintains old fashion ethos

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121914-pharmacy-thumbBY MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Under the radar — complete with a soda counter, the traditional Paulsen's Pharmacy looks to compete with big box retailers.


Read more...

Shifting Ground

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Bans on genetically modified crops create uncertainty for farmers.


Read more...

Water World

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Fred Ziari aims to feed the global population.


Read more...

Political Clout

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Businesses spend billions of dollars each year trying to influence political decision makers by piling money into campaigns.


Read more...

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

The Bookseller

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Everyone knows college is expensive, but a look at the numbers brings that into sharp — and painful — focus.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS