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Boardman plant produces first biofuels

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Wednesday, March 13, 2013

ZeaChem's Boardman plant produced its first biofuel from locally sourced biomass materials.

ZeaChem Inc. said it has produced "commercial-grade cellulosic chemicals and ethanol" at the Boardman biorefinery. ZeaChem, based in Lakewood, Colo., has the capacity to make 250,000 gallons of what it calls "economical and sustainable biofuels and bio-based chemicals" a year.

The Boardman endeavor, which ZeaChem says is a demonstration facility, is one of the world's first cellulosic biorefineries. The company believes its developments can replace fossil fuel-based products.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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