Gleaners support tax break for farmers

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Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Senate Bill 430 would allow farmers to claim a tax deduction for donating food to gleaners and hunger-relief groups.

Gleaning organizations are made up of low-income residents who volunteer to glean food from Oregon farms to feed themselves and needy neighbors, [Oregon Food Bank community food systems manager Sharon] Thornberry said.

Gleaning started in Oregon in 1972, Thornberry said, when Monica Belcher of Washington County saw unharvested fruits and vegetables going to waste on farms. Belcher developed gleaning guides and taught people how to harvest leftover crops and how to prepare and preserve fruits and vegetables.

Read more at Capital Press.

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