Chandra Brown gets Commerce Department post

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Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Clackamas-based United Streetcar CEO Chandra Brown was named the deputy assistant secretary of manufacturing at the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Brown is leaving as the company is struggling to get its long-delayed streetcar into service with Portland Streetcar. The company, the first to produce a modern streetcar in the U.S., got key help from Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., who authored legislation making it difficult for foreign firms to compete with United Streetcar for the Portland work.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}chandra brown{/biztweet}

 

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