Oregon commutes getting worse

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Wednesday, March 06, 2013

A growing number of Oregon residents are forced into extreme commutes due to lasting recession effects.

Even as people find new jobs, they're having trouble selling homes located near jobs they lost during the downturn.

“You may live in Vancouver, but the only job you can find is in Portland,” said Charles Rynerson, a demographer at Portland State University’s Population Research Center. “Of course, you’ll also pay Oregon income tax. But there are also a lot of two-worker families, with jobs on both sides of the river.”

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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