Multnomah County studies coal train effects

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Monday, March 04, 2013

A review of the possible health effects by proposed coal trains traveling through Multnomah County was released by the county's health department.

But the coal industry's data is too scant to gauge the health effects of coal dust blowing off trains, the report says. The mile-plus-long trains could create cumulative delays of up to two hours per day at at-grade rail crossings.

And the trains would run through areas already heavily hit by pollution from cars and trucks, trains and industry, the report's analysis of census data indicates.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}coal train{/biztweet}

 

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