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Light rail becomes issue for Columbia River Crossing

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Thursday, February 28, 2013

The Oregon House approved $450 million in bonds to pay for new Interstate 5 and light rail bridges connecting Portland and Vancouver, but Washington political leaders are still divided.

“It would be a disaster for our county,” said David Madore, a commissioner in Clark County, which includes Vancouver.

Madore’s opposition centers on a plan to expand light rail service with the bridge. Madore says he supports an expanded vehicle bridge, but considers light rail a waste of money that could be better spent on roads and highways. He fears the metro Portland transit agency, TriMet, is trying to expand its tax base into Washington state.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

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