Manufacturers could lose between $30M and $116M from CRC

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Three companies that make structures upriver from the proposed Columbia River Crossing could lose between $30 million and $116 million in profits due to the lower clearance.

That's what CRC managers told the U.S. Coast Guard in a bridge permit application filed Jan. 30 and made public late Tuesday. Officials are using the estimate as they negotiate on potential mitigation payments to the three metal fabricators, which make giant products such as oil drilling rigs.

Told of the estimate Tuesday evening, however, company representatives reacted in disbelief, saying the range, and other figures in the application, were too low.

"All their figures look very low to me," said Jason Pond, chief executive officer of Greenberry Industrial, who wants a lift span to be added to the new bridge. "They're trying to look at it in a way that's most beneficial to the CRC, not to us."

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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