Eugene bag ban nearly here

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Eugene's plastic bag ban begins May 1, and it will apply to more than just grocery stores.

Stores ranging from mom and pop corner markets and independent bookstores to national big box chains will have to adhere to the ban or face potential city fines.

Most of the publicity about the ban has focused on the thinnest plastic bags, which are handed out by the millions each year at Eugene grocery stores. However, many other plastic bags distributed by retailers are less than four mils thick so they, too, will be banned.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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