Oregon aims to double STEM college degrees

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Friday, February 22, 2013

As part of Oregon's efforts to double the number of college degrees in science, technology, engineering and math by 2030, The University of Oregon and Arcimoto teamed up to host Lane County educators.

“Electric cars and solar power are our future,” said Dean Livelybrooks, a UO faculty leader for the center, in a press release. “Arcimoto and EWEB engineers clearly find the development of these key technologies to be both stimulating and challenging – our job is to help them share the fun with teachers and their students, growing intrinsic motivation for STEM careers and learning in schools.”

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}oregon stem{/biztweet}

 

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