Prineville students design and build wind turbines

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

A Crook County middle school teacher is launching a KidWind Challenge, using a grant from Facebook to help students design and build wind turbines.

The KidWind Challenge in Prineville will invite student teams to use their science, technology, engineering and math skills to come up with innovative wind turbine designs that will be tested and defended to a panel of judges made up of local energy industry professionals.

There's also momentum to expand the program across Oregon.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}kidwind{/biztweet}

 

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