Willamette Valley becoming a solar power hotbed

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Friday, February 15, 2013

Despite seeing 144 to 166 days of rain a year, the Willamette Valley is positioning itself as a solar power hotbed.

One of the newest solar farms in the region is under construction just east of Woodburn. Leo Ilg, a sheep rancher, owns 38 acres on Newman Road where a total of 1,632 solar panels — each measuring 3.5 feet by 5.5 feet — are being “planted” to harness energy from the sun.

Ilg is leasing two of his acres to an energy consortium that will operate the solar field on his property.

Before the proposal came along, Ilg was primarily grazing sheep and selling hay. Now, an energy company will be sending him checks for the right to use his land, providing Ilg with an additional revenue stream.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}willamette solar{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Celestial Eats

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER AND EILEEN GARVIN

A power lunch at Solstice Wood Fire Cafe & Bar.


Read more...

Photo Diary: Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Latest
Thursday, May 14, 2015
IMG 8469BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

There are more than 160 farmers markets in Oregon, contributing an estimated $50 million in sales, according to the Oregon Farmers Markets Association. We checked in on the Forest Grove market, which for several years has brought local produce and food vendors to Main Street in the center of town.


Read more...

Shades of Gray

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Are we too quick to diagnose corruption?


Read more...

5 questions for Flywheel CEO Rakesh Mathur

The Latest
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
FW splashBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Portland is awash in rideshare options. We ask the head of Flywheel what sets his app apart.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

Make the Case

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015

10 briefcases that mean business.


Read more...

The Good Hacker

May 2015
Friday, April 24, 2015
BY CHRIS HIGGINS

As digital security breaches skyrocket, a cybersleuth everyman takes center stage.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS