EnerG2 celebrates one year

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Thursday, February 14, 2013

Albany's EnerG2 facility is celebrating one year of being the only manufacturing plant in the world dedicated to commercial-scale production of engineered carbon material.

Officials at Seattle-based EnerG2, which last month closed on a $9.4 million venture investment, say that its Willamette Valley plant is the only one in the world producing advanced, nano-structured carbon materials.

The company is tight-lipped about its production figures and the customers it is serving — makers of advanced batteries and related energy storage devices. Officials say the company has relationships with more than 100 customers and potential customers, all of which must test the material before integrating it into their product.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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