Portland getting Girl Scout cookie pop-up shop

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Thursday, February 14, 2013

The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington are opening a pop-up shop in downtown Portland to sell their trademark cookies.

The box redesign is the first since 1999, said Sarah Miller, communications director. It was supposed to come out with the Girl Scouts centennial last year, but was delayed.

Now, the meaning behind cookie sales and Girl Scouts are displayed on the box. The back panel explains the significance of badges girls can earn, with different badges on each flavor. A side panel lists the skills girls learn through cookie sales: goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}girl scout cookie{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Unshakable

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY BRIAN LIBBY

Ben Kaiser holds his ground.


Read more...

Business partnerships: taming the three-headed monster

Contributed Blogs
Monday, July 06, 2015
070615-businessmarriagefail-thumbBY KATHERINE HEEKIN | OB GUEST COLUMNIST

Picking a business partner is not much different than choosing a spouse or life partner, and the business break-up can be as heart-wrenching and costly as divorce.


Read more...

Best Foot Forward

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Whether you're stepping out to work or onto the track, Pacific Northwest shoe companies have you covered.


Read more...

Portland’s long-distance bike commuters

The Latest
Monday, August 03, 2015
Matt KellyresizethumbBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

Pushing the extreme.


Read more...

The Cover Story

Linda Baker
Thursday, August 27, 2015
01-cover-0915-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

How do you put a baby on the cover of a business magazine without it looking too cutesy?


Read more...

Loose Talk

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

When gossip crosses the line.


Read more...

Farm in a Box

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Most of the food Americans consume is trucked in from hundreds of miles away. Eric Wilson, co-founder and CEO of Gro-volution, wants to change that. So this past spring, the Air Force veteran and former greenhouse manager started work on an alternative farming system he claims is more efficient than conventional agriculture, and also shortens the distance between the consumer and the farm.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS