Portland getting Girl Scout cookie pop-up shop

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Thursday, February 14, 2013

The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington are opening a pop-up shop in downtown Portland to sell their trademark cookies.

The box redesign is the first since 1999, said Sarah Miller, communications director. It was supposed to come out with the Girl Scouts centennial last year, but was delayed.

Now, the meaning behind cookie sales and Girl Scouts are displayed on the box. The back panel explains the significance of badges girls can earn, with different badges on each flavor. A side panel lists the skills girls learn through cookie sales: goal setting, decision making, money management, people skills, and business ethics.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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