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Stayton approves tax hike

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Must Reads
Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Stayton City Council voted to raise the franchise tax on residents' electric bills.

According to [city finance director Christine] Shaffer, the city’s tax base is lower than previously was expected because of a decrease in property values. Taxes collected from alcohol and tobacco sales also are down, she said. Because of these losses, the city has been left looking for more sources of revenue to meet its budget.

According to Pacific Power, the average residential customer’s bill runs approximately $100.23 per month. The current franchise tax, which is 5 percent, adds $5.01 to the bill. With the increase, this will go up to an average of $7.01 per month.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}stayton tax{/biztweet}

 

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