Crowdfunding presents problems

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Thursday, February 07, 2013

Crowdfunding is growing in popularity, but it raises the issue of who is accountable when a project is delayed.

Since it started in April 2009, Kickstarter has helped match more than $450 million donated by 3 million people with 35,000 successful projects. About 50,000 proposed projects failed to raise their goals and received no money through the website.

“We’re really just focused on creating a platform to be able to allow creators and backers to connect,” says Justin Kazmark, a Kickstarter spokesman at the company’s New York City headquarters.

On Kickstarter, project creators either raise their goal amount and get all of the money, or they don’t raise enough and get nothing. Kickstarter has no control over whether projects are completed.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

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