Plastic bag ban could include a fee

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Wednesday, February 06, 2013

The expanding effort to ban plastic bags in Oregon could include a five-cent fee for paper bags.

The Legislature tried unsuccessfully to ban plastic bags statewide to reduce litter and ocean pollution in 2011. Since then the cities of Portland, Corvallis and Eugene have passed plastic bag bans.

Portland’s ban will expand from large stores only to all stores and eateries, including food carts and farmers markets, in October. It does not include a fee for the paper bags replacing the less expensive plastic bags.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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