Portland may require paid sick days

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Thursday, January 31, 2013

Currently, 80% of Portland's food service workers receive no paid sick days, a fact that may soon change.

Last week, four Portland restaurant owners—of Pine State Biscuits, Grain and Gristle, ¿Por Qué No?, and Mekong Bistro—penned a letter backing a proposal that would require every business with more than six employees to allow their workers to accrue up to five paid sick days annually.

City Commissioner Amanda Fritz submitted a draft of the proposal this month, something that unions and worker advocacy groups have long desired. The plan, which city council will hear on January 31, is similar to a policy passed last year by Seattle, which became only the third city in America to require paid sick days.

Read more at The Mercury.

{biztweet}portland sick day{/biztweet}

 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 ownerGuest 2013-01-31 19:32:23
Mandating sick days? Are you crazy? Why don't they call them what they really are: Vacation Days. What's the difference between sick days and vacation days? Nothing. Mandating time off is flat wrong. Is this Russia? I hope not. It should be up to an employer to determine their employee vacation plans and compete in a free market to attract employees without a "one size fits all" bureaucratic iron fist. We absolutely have to stop trying to legislate every single thing. Somebody stop this nonsense!
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Guest
0 #2 Past Restaurant OwnerGuest 2013-01-31 21:49:09
Let's just take away all the insentive to work. If I would have had to pay an employee each time they called in sick, usually on a Friday or Monday; and then replace them I would have been closed in a year. How much is Amanda willing to pay for her turkey wrap?
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Guest
0 #3 Explain?Guest 2013-02-12 23:59:50
I get the idea of paying someone to not be at work as a bummer for the business owner but what they are proposing is that honest workers who are sick are not worried about their income when making the decision to go to work or stay at home when you are sick. If you are sick, and work in the food industry, wouldn't you want a sick employee to stay at home and get better instead of spreading their cold? Nothing in the article says it would be mandatory time off and if you have employees that are abusing their 5 extra paid days then it's their loss when they are actually sick. Or maybe those employees shouldn't be your employees anymore? Maybe as an outside source I need more understanding of how this will effect the businesses in Portland negatively.
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Guest
0 #4 ownerGuest 2013-02-13 00:51:59
Don't be naive. Sick days inevitably turn into extra vacation days. There's absolutely no way to police it.
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Guest
0 #5 I get itGuest 2013-02-14 05:42:10
I get that people will abuse the system, it's sadly what our society is prone too but for the people who really do worry about their income when they are sick and choose to go into work when they shouldn't, even if it's a minority of people (in your perspective) wouldn't it be more of a help than a hinderence in this economy? I am naive about this subject, I've never owned a restaurant or had employees. This is why it's hard for me to grasp the negative reaction, especially when this was the idea of actual restaurant owners from Portland to try to get this passed.
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Guest
0 #6 OwnerGuest 2013-02-14 06:47:10
I agree that it's too bad employees aren't honest about sick time. But, I've tried it and proven that sick days just eventually turn into extra vacation days. The one thing I believe this discussion highlights is the fact that it's a mistake to try to legislate everything. One size doesn't fit all, and in most cases, we're better off to allow the free market to take its course.
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