Boy Scouts policy change could restore Intel donations

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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

If the Boy Scouts decide to allow gay members, it could bring back one of the organization's main financial benefactors, Intel.

In 2010 alone, Intel donated $180,000 to Boy Scout councils, troops and Cub Scout packs in Oregon, according to Intel Foundation tax filings. Hundreds of thousands of dollars more went to Boy Scouts elsewhere -- triggered by an Intel policy that provides a $10 corporate donation for each hour employees spend volunteering at nonprofits and schools.

But last year, Intel said it will begin requiring that donation recipients write a letter indicating that they comply with Intel's nondiscrimination policy -- which forbids exclusion based on sexual orientation.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}boy scout intel{/biztweet}

 

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