Trees benefit business districts

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Every dollar a city invests in trees returns $2.70 in benefits, according to research by the U.S. Forest Service.

Research by the University of Washington tells us consumers are likely to spend more money on parking and shopping in tree-lined business districts than in those without trees. Healthy trees send positive messages about the appeal of a district, the quality of products there and what customer service a shopper can expect — they’re an important component of any program to attract shoppers and visitors. 

Read more at the Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}trees{/biztweet}

 

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