Japanese firm may grow azuki beans in Oregon

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Thursday, January 17, 2013

A Japanese company is considering producing azuki beans in the Treasure Valley of Eastern Oregon.

Company officials have toured the area with economic development representatives, met with local farmers and looked at potential facilities.

Nyssa farmer Reid Saito, who grew one acre of the beans, said it is now wait-and-see, as the officials of the Japanese firm will be making their decisions for the coming year. It is still very preliminary, Saito said.

Read more at The Argus Observer.

{biztweeT}azuki bean{/biztweet}

 

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