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PGE proposes shortening transmission project

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Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Portland General Electric wants to cut 101 miles off the proposed Cascade Crossing transmission line project.

The Portland-based electric utility initially proposed a 215-mile transmission project starting at Boardman and connecting to Salem. But under the modified plan, the project would instead stop short 18 miles southwest of Maupin — 101 miles shorter than the original plan — at a new substation called Pine Grove that PGE would build.

From there the line would link up with the BPA's system, said PGE spokesman Steve Corson.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}pge transmission{/biztweet}

 

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