Portland restaurateurs opening restaurants abroad

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Friday, January 11, 2013

Two Portland restaurateurs are opening second locations in China and Japan.

As The Oregonian first reported last month, Pho Van, Portland's 20-year-old Vietnamese mini-chain, opened a location in Beijing late last year. And Slappy Cakes, Southeast Portland's do-it-yourself pancake spot, will open an outpost in Tokyo's bustling Shinjuku Station area by the end of this month.

Here in Portland, the restaurants making the Pacific Ocean leap aren't the ones commonly featured in glossy food magazines or run by chefs with cooking-show engagements. Pho Van and Slappy Cakes are solid, familiar spots, well-known to neighbors but little known outside the Rose City, let alone in China.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}restaurant portland{/biztweet}

 

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