Truckers: 'You can't wait to get out of Oregon so you can relax'

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Oregon is experimenting with salting roads along a few state border crossings to de-ice them, but it has no plans to apply rock salt to Interstate 84, where a tour bus crash last month killed nine people.

Most neighboring states use rock salt on their roads, so drivers may face icier roads as they cross into Oregon, which has cost and environmental reasons for relying on sand and less-corrosive magnesium chloride.

Salt lowers the freezing temperature of water. But rock salt also rusts out vehicles and bridges, and Oregon doesn't want rock salt winding up in the Columbia Basin, the East Oregonian reported.

The Oregon State Police say the Dec. 30 tour bus crash happened on a stretch of road with ice and snow patches, but they have said it may take weeks to determine what caused it.

The crash, though, has raised the question of salting Oregon highways.

"Am I in the minority that feels like there is a moral obligation to this?" said Oregon truck driver Larry Phelps. "At some point we have to see that this is costing lives. I'm tired of seeing cars turned upside down on my route."

Phelps, 62, said the state is a running joke among truckers: "You can't wait to get out of the state so you can relax."

Read more by KVAL.com.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
+1 #1 Don’t Salt the RoadsGuest 2013-01-09 22:58:49
I grew up in the Great Lakes snow belt of upstate New York where they put salt on the roads and a vehicle that might be mechanically fine for well over 100,000 miles only makes it about half of that because it rots out from underneath you. Even if you drive through salt and park your car for extended periods unless you get under it and wash the salt off it will rot while it sits. But there was a lot of snow and ice there. I lived for 25 years in Montana where roads are not salted, there is also a lot of snow and ice and people just learn how to drive in winter weather. Idaho is the same. Here snow and ice are rare and instead of learning weather-appropr iate driving skills, drivers want to have to buy three times the number of cars and trucks as they do now?

Don’t do it. It will be a business boon for car sales, car insurance premiums and body shops, but it will cost thousands of dollars a year for drivers in repair and replacement costs for our vehicles.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+1 #2 Rot BoxGuest 2013-01-11 17:03:58
I live in PA where they salt the roads and made a living patching 5 year old cars that you could see through becuase of rust. They salt the roads and people still drive on bald summer tires.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Quake as metaphor

Linda Baker
Tuesday, July 14, 2015
071515-earthquakia-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

The Big One serves as an allegory for Portland, a city that earns plaudits for lifestyle and amenities but whose infrastructure is, literally, crumbling.


Read more...

Preserving the Legacy

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

A New York floral and gift business takes on the iconic Harry & David brand.


Read more...

Downtime with Debra Ringold

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Dean of the Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Willamette University


Read more...

The Private 150: From Strength to Strength

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Revenues in Oregon's private, for profit sector maintained solid growth as the economy continued to rebound.


Read more...

Stemming the tide of money in politics

Linda Baker
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
 jeff-lang-2012-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

Jeff Lang and his wife Rae used to dole out campaign checks like candy.  “We were like alcoholics,” Lang says. ”We couldn’t just give a little.”


Read more...

Photo Log: Waterfront Blues Festival

The Latest
Thursday, July 09, 2015
bluesfestthumbBY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The sweltering weather didn't keep the crowds away. Although the numbers were down slightly from last year, the Oregon Food Bank raised $850,636 to fight hunger.  About 80,000 people attended despite temperatures in the upper 90s.


Read more...

Modern design defines new Portland indoor market

The Latest
Thursday, June 25, 2015
thumbSnøhetta JBPM exterior www mir noBY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

An international architecture firm known for its design of the National September 11 Memorial Museum Pavilion in New York unveiled its plan this week for a modern indoor/outdoor food market at the foot of the Morrison Bridge in downtown Portland.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS