Oregon to experiment with salting roads

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Tuesday, January 08, 2013

Oregon is experimenting with salting roads along a few state border crossings to de-ice them.

Most neighboring states use rock salt on their roads, so drivers may face icier roads as they cross into Oregon, which has cost and environmental reasons for relying on sand and less-corrosive magnesium chloride.

Salt lowers the freezing temperature of water. But rock salt also rusts out vehicles and bridges, and Oregon doesn't want rock salt winding up in the Columbia Basin, the East Oregonian reported.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}salt road{/biztweet}

 

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