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ShopIgniter co-founder steps aside

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Thursday, January 03, 2013

Co-founder Alan Wizemann will remain on the board of ShopIgniter, but is stepping aside as chief product officer to be a consultant for Target.

The company has raised $11 million in venture backing, most recently an $8 million round in 2011.

ShopIgniter helps brands promote their brand, and sell their wares, on Facebook and through other social networking channels. Its client list includes Nike, Levi's and CafePress.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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