Home Must Reads Energy drinks fall short of claims

Energy drinks fall short of claims

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Must Reads
Wednesday, January 02, 2013

Energy drinks are the fastest-growing part of the beverage industry, but are now under scrutiny by the FDA and are falling short of advertised claims.

Interviews with researchers and a review of scientific studies show: the energy drink industry is based on a brew of ingredients that, apart from caffeine, have little, if any benefit for consumers.

Energy drink companies have promoted their products not as caffeine-fueled concoctions but as specially engineered blends that provide something more.

Promoting a message beyond caffeine has enabled the beverage makers to charge premium prices. A 16-ounce energy drink that sells for $2.99 a can contains about the same amount of caffeine as a tablet of NoDoz that costs 30 cents. Even Starbucks coffee is cheap by comparison; a 12-ounce cup that costs $1.85 has even more caffeine.

Read more at Bend Bulletin.

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