Chinese men accused of trying to smuggle Lattice Semiconductor chips

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Wednesday, December 19, 2012

The U.S. government accused two Chinese men of trying to smuggle programmable computer chips from Hillsboro's Lattice Semiconductor to China.

Wan Li Yuan and Jiang Song conspired to smuggle chips known as programmable logic devices, or PLDs, according to a 12-count indictment unsealed Tuesday in Portland's U.S. District Court. Chips they tried to procure can be used for military equipment such as radar, data acquisition and missile guidance systems, the indictment alleges.

The two are charged with conspiring to launder money and violating the International Emergency Economic Powers Act to smuggle goods. They also face 10 counts of money laundering; each carries a potential punishment of as much as 20 years in prison.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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