Home Must Reads Feds using forfeiture laws against pot growers

Feds using forfeiture laws against pot growers

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Must Reads
Monday, December 17, 2012

Federal authorities are using asset-forfeiture laws to seize money and property from people that exploit Oregon's medical marijuana program.

Civil forfeiture laws allow police to seize the proceeds of illegal activity without necessarily filing criminal charges against those involved.

In one 2011 case, police seized more than $120,000 in cash and nearly $34,000 worth of precious metals from a registered Grants Pass medical-marijuana grower accused of shipping pot to the East Coast.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}oregon pot{/biztweet}

 

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Guest
0 #1 Concerned CitizenGuest 2012-12-17 20:38:39
Yes, but they can't seem to slow down the insidious killing of our children with powerful weapons. Seems like they should spend their time on more important crimes. You know, the ones where people have been or will be killed.
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