Gun used in Clackamas mall shooting appeals to youth

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Friday, December 14, 2012

The type of rifle used in the Clackamas mall shooting, an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, attracts a younger generation of shooters.

Ruger CEO Mike Fifer told me that those military-style weapons—called modern sporting rifles in an effort to apply more neutral branding—are meant for ex-serviceman. The closely held Freedom Group, which is the nation’s leader in long guns, is not as tight lipped about why these weapons are made and who they’re made for: “We believe the adoption of the modern sporting rifle has led to increased long-term growth in the long gun market while attracting a younger generation of shooters. We anticipate a renewed interest in the outdoors driving increased participation in hunting and target shooting.” Those were the (now) eerie words included in a recent annual report to Freedom Group shareholders.

Firearm fever is, indeed, all around us. Ruger’s profits are up 75% in five years; Smith & Wesson’s up 28%. The FBI’s background check system crashed twice in a single day last month, following President Obama’s reelection, and the two largest days ever for gun sales came after the president’s two successful elections. Much of this rapid increase has come because many gun-owners believe Obama will champion anti-gun legislation. So far, the president has done nothing about guns, having faced far greater issues than firearms.

Read more at Forbes.

{biztweet}clackamas{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Up in the Air

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ANNIE ELLISON

Portland tech veteran Ben Berry is leaving his post as Portland’s chief technology officer for a full-time role producing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) aimed at first responders and the military. Berry’s AirShip Technologies Group is poised to be on the ground floor of an industry that will supply drones to as many as 100,000 police, fire and emergency agencies nationwide. He reveals the plan for takeoff.


Read more...

Efficiency Boost

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

How conservation stimulates the local economy.


Read more...

Nine lives

Linda Baker
Friday, May 22, 2015
0f4f7bfBY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

Roy Kaufmann always lands on his feet.


Read more...

The ancient fish that stops bullets

The Latest
Friday, May 08, 2015
hagfishthumbBY CHRIS NOBLE | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Hagfish may not have evolved much over the last 300 million years, but their protein-heavy slime promises advances in super-materials.


Read more...

6 highlights from the Craft Brewers Conference

The Latest
Friday, April 17, 2015
thumbcbcPHOTOS BY  JASON E. KAPLAN

The 32nd annual CBC attracted a record number of attendees (11,000)  to the Oregon Convention Center.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS