Oregon lawmakers consider a sales tax

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Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Three Oregon politicians are saying it's time to add a 5% sales tax to the state's tax plan.

The three will push a plan in the 2013 Legislature that would use revenue from a 5 percent sales tax to make big cuts in income tax rates, provide property tax breaks and still raise an extra $1 billion a year for the state budget.

“If everybody’s tax burden stays the same and we can bring in $1 billion extra every year for education, that sounds pretty good,” says Sen. Mark Hass (D-Beaverton).

The idea is being pushed by Hass, Sen. Ginny Burdick (D-Portland) and Rep. Tobias Read (D-Beaverton). Hass and Read especially are feeling heat from constituents who say state funding levels are starving local schools. The Beaverton School District laid off more than 100 teachers this year.

Read more at Willamette Week.

{biztweet}sales tax{/biztweet}

 

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Guest
+1 #1 It must be magic!Guest 2012-12-05 20:50:15
“If everybody’s tax burden stays the same and we can bring in $1 billion extra every year"

DAMN...that does sound good!! Where, pray tell, will that "extra $1 billion" come from?...it must be some kind of magic or alchemy that allows politicians to make something out of nothing. In my experience they're much better at making nothing out of something!
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Guest
0 #2 You just don't understandGuest 2012-12-05 22:16:01
“If everybody’s tax burden stays the same and we can bring in $1 billion extra every year"
This means that if our state tax burden remains the same. The extra comes form the proposed 5% sales tax. Oh wait a minute... Isn't that more tax burden? Good grief, let's see how many more folks and businesses we can run out of the state. And, no matter how much more you throw at the schools, the education is still going to stink as long as you have the system in the hands of the unions. You know, like the CFT in California and the great video they just released, demonizing teh wealthy. You know those horrible people who have busted their buns, sacrificed long hours, and often their health to provide jobs and revenue for the state. Those evil rich folks. Wait a minute, don't they pay the majority of the taxes in this great country? So the dems can dole out more $$ to those individuals who choose not to work?
What a mess..
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Guest
0 #3 MeGuest 2012-12-05 23:54:42
YEAH....our elected reps do such a good job of managing our tax money....let's give them MORE!!!!
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Guest
0 #4 rdrGuest 2012-12-06 19:28:13
This is an important idea for Oregon's economic (not just school funding) health. Having the near-highest marginal income and capital gains rates in the US (which is high itself) drives business investment elsewhere (as does the terrible OR estate tax, which drives investors and entrepreneurs away). Some extra revenue would come from out-of-state purchases (e.g.at restaurants in Portland) by visitors and tourists. And in general, it is better to tax consumption than productivity, savings and investment.

The preceding three dumb knee-jerk responses suggest Oregon needs to get a lot smarter if it is going to be successful.
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