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Portland trash falls 38 percent

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Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Changes to Portland's trash and recycling pickups led to a 38% drop in garbage picked up over the last year.

Starting Halloween 2011, Portland added curbside pickup of food scraps, expanded to weekly pickup of yard debris, and reduced garbage pickups to every two weeks. In the subsequent 12-month period, haulers picked up 58,300 tons of garbage from residential customers, down from 94,100 tons the prior 12-month period.

Clearly much of the diverted garbage went into the green yard debris and food scrap carts.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}portland trash{/biztweet}

 

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