Genetically modified salmon may not make it

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Tuesday, December 04, 2012

A company that makes genetically modified salmon that grows twice as fast as normal may not be able to stay afloat.

After weathering concerns about everything from the safety of humans eating the salmon to their impact on the environment, Aquabounty was poised to become the world's first company to sell fish whose DNA has been altered to speed up growth.

The Food and Drug Administration in 2010 concluded that Aquabounty's salmon was as safe to eat as the traditional variety. The agency also said that there's little chance that the salmon could escape and breed with wild fish, which could disrupt the fragile relationships between plants and animals in the wild. But more than two years later the FDA has still not approved the fish, and Aquabounty is running out of money.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}salmon{/biztweet}

 

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